Posted by: Bozena Kraj | July 7, 2010

Time for holidays!

Dear friends, teachers and students from our partner schools. Thanks a lot for your work and collaboration. Now let’s enjoy summer holidays. Bur don’t forget us and our eTwinning!

Bożena Kraj and students from Daleszyce, Poland

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Posted by: selinb | July 2, 2010

First Prize

 

etw_qualitylabel_15789_en

Our project have been just awarded  with a Quality Label.Thank to all our project partners very much  from Spain,Greece,Poland,Czech Republic and Slovakia. İt was very nice work with you all

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | June 30, 2010

Thank you very much! Greetings from Daleszyce

GIMNAZJUM im. Jana Pawla II
26-021 Daleszyce, ul. Sienkiewicza 11B

Daleszyce, 25 June 2010

To the coordinators from Greece, Spain, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Turkey and Poland

Dear Sir/ Madam,
As the head teacher of John Paul II Junior High School in Daleszyce, Poland I would like to express my great satisfaction with the eTwinning cooperation we have had with your school since September 2009.
The project entitled “Our town in the old times” is a spectacular one and it is well suited for educational aims of our schools and helps us open doors to education of the future, which must be morę international, integrated and collaborative.
Our participation in the project has integrated teachers and students and encouraged European integration, which is so significant nowadays. I feel obliged to say that my school is open to eTwinning projects like that, as they provide opportunities for European cooperation. What is morę, I am so glad that technological resources, computer labs arę used morę extensively as tools for teaching history, geography, English, culture and encourage international friendship.
I am sending greetings from Daleszyce, Poland and hope that our schools will be good eTwinning partners in the future as well.
Yours faithfully,

Mr. Jan Cedro, the head teacher

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | June 23, 2010

Thank you eTwinning partners!

We would like to thank you everybody for the second project.

Thank you

Badalona, Daleszyce, Istanbul, Paralia Patra and Topolcany!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

 

It was great to be with you on this blog!

Take care~! Bye bye everyone!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

 

 

 

PS. I hope that you will get our postcards 🙂

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | June 15, 2010

The November Uprising

In 1830 many of the inhabitants of Kielce took part in the November Uprising against Russia. In 1844 a priest Piotr Ściegienny intended a local uprising to liberate Kielce from Russian rule, for which he was sent to Siberia.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | June 15, 2010

Old Polish Industrial Zone

Hello! My name’s Tom. Wikipedia says that thanks to the efforts by Stanisław Staszic Kielce became the centre of the newly-established Old-Polish Industrial Zone (Staropolski Okręg Przemysłowy). The town grew quickly as new mines, quarries and factories were constructed. In 1816 the first Polish technical university was founded in Kielce. However, after Staszic’s death the Industrial Zone declined and in 1826 the school was moved to Warsaw and became the Warsaw University of Technology.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | June 15, 2010

The 3rd Partition

 

As a result of the 3rd Partition the town was annexed by Austria. During the Polish-Austrian War of 1809 it was captured by prince Józef Poniatowski and joined with the Duchy of Warsaw, but after the fall of Napoleon Bonaparte in 1815 it was joined with the Kingdom of Poland. For a brief period when Kraków was an independent city-state (Republic of Kraków), Kielce became the capital of the Kraków Voivodeship. Ann from 2c.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | June 15, 2010

Kielce in the 18th century

Old Kielce

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In 1789 Kielce were nationalised and the burgers were granted the right to elect their own representatives in Sejm. Until the end of the century the city’s economy entered a period of fast growth. A brewery was founded as well as several brick factories, a horse breeder, hospital, school and a religious college.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | June 15, 2010

The deluge

The cathedral hill which was safe during the Deluge

During The Deluge the town was pillaged and burnt by the Swedes. Only the palace and the church survived, but the town managed to recover under the rule of bishop Andrzej Załuski. By 1761 Kielce had more than 4,000 inhabitants.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | June 15, 2010

Kielce – rich in minerals

Hi! I’ Peter. The area around Kielce was rich in minerals such as copper or, lead ore, and iron, as well as limestone. In the 15th century Kielce became a significant centre of metallurgy. There were also several glass factories and armourer shops in the town. In 1527 bishop Piotr Tomicki founded a bell for the church and between 1637 and 1642 Manierist palace was erected near the market place by Bishop Jakub Zadzik. It is one of the very few examples of French Renaissance architecture in Poland and the only example of a magnate’s manor from the times of Vasa dynasty to survive World War II.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | November 15, 2010

The palace of Cracow Bishops in Kielce

Here you can see the Palace of Kraków Bishops (1637–1641): summer residence of Bishops of Kraków, built in early baroque style by Giovanni Battista Trevano and Tomasz Poncino; houses a museum with an important gallery of Polish paintings now. The founder of Kielce parish lived there. His name was Jakub Zadzik. Greetings from class 2c.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | November 14, 2010

The main square with the Town Hall

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It is nice to say that the place is still changing. It is going to be revitalised this year. So people are hard working there to make it look nice, modern and better without any cars. Now look at the photos. They are so moving the more that my family used to live not far from there. Klara

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | October 15, 2010

Tomasz Zieliński’s manor house in Kielce

Here you can see Tomasz Zieliński’s romantic manor (1846–1858) situated in the centre of Kielce. It is near the park and near the cathedral. It looks quite nice even now and it’s a place of numerous cultural events. Dawid. Look at the slides too.

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Posted by: Bozena Kraj | October 14, 2010

The railway station in Kielce

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It is interesting to see how the building of the railway station in Kielce has changed. Maybe it looked better in the past. It had a characater and was so much connected with the life of its passengers going by train in different directions. The events were happy but also unhappy during the second world war. Greetings from Daleszyce. Kate

[foto - zamek]

Łagów, the most beautiful place in Lubuskie province, is located  half way between Poznań and Berlin, in the middle of old beech forests. There is a castle, built by the Joannici order in XIV century, on the hill surrounded by the park, where two lakes join. The present structure of the castle, which has not been changed since XVII century, consists of four two-storey wings, which form a renaissance courtyard. The highest point of the castle is the tower, from which one can see a beautiful view of the area. In the castle there is a hotel, a restaurant, a coffee bar and a representative Knights Room.

Zamek Joannitów

Zamek Joannitów

Zamek Joannitów

historia

historia

historia

historia

Położenie

Położenie

Położenie

Położenie

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | June 8, 2010

Palaces in Lubuskie province

Palace in Zatonie, 17 c

Palace in Rogi

 Palace in Wiejce

Palace in Mierzęcin

Pałac w PrzytokuPalace in Przytok

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | June 8, 2010

Castles in Lubuskie province

Zamek Joannitów w ŁagowieCastle in Łagów Lubuski 

Zamek Joannitów w Łagowie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 King’s Castle in Międzyrzecz, 14 c

Castle in Kożuchów, 14 c

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zamek rycerski w SiedliskuCastle in  Siedlisko, 13 c.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zamek Dewinów-Bibersteinów w ŻarachCastle in Żary, 13 c

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | June 4, 2010

Bishops of Cracow and a new settlement in Kielce

The coat of arms of Bishop Jakub Zadzik

The area of the Holy Cross Mountains was almost unpopulated until the 11th century when the first hunters established permanent settlements at the outskirts of the mountains. They needed a place to trade furs and meat for grain and other necessary products, and so the market of Kielce was formed. In the early 12th century the new settlement became a property of the Bishops of Kraków, who built a wooden church and a manor. In 1171 a stone church was erected by bishop Gedeon Gryf. During the times of Wincenty Kadłubek a parochial school in Kielce was opened in 1229. By 1295 the town was granted city rights. I like the coat of arm of Bishop Zadzik. Eva.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | June 4, 2010

Other legends about Kielce

Hello again. I like history and old legends. Various other legends exist to explain the name’s origin. One states that the town was named after its founder who belonged to the noble family of Kiełcz, while another claims that it stems from the Kelts who may have lived in the area in previous centuries. Other theories connect the town’s name to occupational names relating to mud huts, iron tips for arrows and spears, or the production of tar (pkielce, a settlement of tar makers). The earliest extant document referring to the settlement by the name of Kielce dates to 1213.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | June 4, 2010

Kelts and Vistulans

Hi! I’m Eva. I must tell you that the area of Kielce has been inhabited since at least the 5th century BC. Until the 6th or 7th century the banks of the Silnica were inhabited by Kelts. They were driven out by a Slavic tribe of Vistulans who started hunting in the nearby huge forests and had settled most of the area now known as Małopolska and present-day Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship. The lands of Wiślanie were at first subdued by Bohemia.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | June 4, 2010

Greetings from Turkey and Daleszyce!

We would like to show you some beautiful places in Turkey our school representatives visited last week. Greetings for you and our Turkish partners also from Istanbul!

Posted by: joanmolar | May 25, 2010

Murtra’s Abbey

This is a video about our trip to Sant Jeroni de la Murtra Abbey.

This is an olg gothic abbey from XV century we have in Badalona’s landscape.

We hope you enjoy it.

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | May 25, 2010

Flood in Poland

This year is really difficult for our country. After the national tragedy we have to fight with the natural disaster – flood.  We experienced such flood 13 years ago. After this time this monster came back to us again. I didn’t expect that the flood will be so huge. But unfortunately I wasn’t right.

The neighbourhood of Zabor is in danger too. Students of our school live very close to the river. The biggest wave will be here this night or tommorow.

Odra - Cigacice oraz Pomorsko (24.05.2010)

 Milsko 3 km from Zabor

Nowa Sól, port (24.05.2010 stan na godz. 19.30) Nowa  Sól

Górzykowo koło Cigacic  Górzykowo near Cigacice

Powódź 2010, Przewóz Przewóz

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | May 25, 2010

Odra River by Patrycja Zawistowska, class 2a

Here are the photos near Odra River near Wielobłota made this spring in April 2010 by Patrycja Zawistowska, class 2a.

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | May 24, 2010

Lubuskie – Our home

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These photos are made by our students from their neighbourhood. Aren’t they beautiful?
🙂

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | May 17, 2010

King Jagiello

Hello! I’m Klara from Class 1a in Daleszyce. This is my presentation of the king, who visited the Holy Cross monastery about 6 times, and once before the most important medieval battle – Grunwald. Look!

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | May 15, 2010

Kielce – a place to sail and swim

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There is a place where you could and still can do water sports. It’s a kind of a pod or an artificial lake. It looks much better now. But look at old photos – and look at a good place to relax. Dawid.

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Now look at the old photos of the street. The most important buildings there are: The Holy Trinity Church, the Catholic Seminary for priests, schools, the Zielinski mansion house, 2 old houses.Look! Klara

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | May 14, 2010

Mala Street in Kielce

It’s a really short street and there are only two old photos of it. There were shops, a cafe an a hotel on the corner. Ann.

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | May 13, 2010

Hermine von Reuss – the owner of palace in Saabor

Hermine, the Empress Wilhelm II of Germany (1887-1947).  was the last owner of the palace in Saabor. Heinrich XXII, Reigning Prince Reuss zu Greiz (1846-1902) and Ida, Princess of Schaumburg-Lippe (1852-1891) were her parents. Her mother unfortunately died when she was 4 years old.

 Hermine

 Her children

The palace

 Hermine

 Wilhelm II and Hermine

Plik:Bundesarchiv Bild 136-C0805, Kaiserpaar im Haus Doorn.jpg

Willhelm II and Hermine in Doorn, 1938

Hermine back in Saabor after her husband’s death

 Her son, Johann Georg and his wife

     The coat of arms of Saabor

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | May 13, 2010

Article 2 about our past: King Wladyslaw Jagiello

The king's monument

Hello! I’m Mateusz. This time we want to tell you about Wladyslaw Jagiello. This king walked as a pilgrim to the monastery of Swiety Krzyz, where the relics of the Holy Cross have been preserved for centuries. It was before the battle of Grunwald, he prayed for his victory. So, he was Grand Duke of Lithuania (1377–1434), king-consort of Kingdom of Poland, and sole King of Poland (1399–1434). He ruled in Lithuania at first with his uncle Kęstutis. In 1386, he converted Lithuania to Christianity, was baptized as Władysław, married the young Rex Polonorum Jadwiga of Poland, and was crowned Poland’s king-consort as Władysław Jagiełło.His own reign in Poland started in 1399, upon death of Queen Jadwiga, and lasted a further thirty-five years and laid the foundation for the centuries-long Polish–Lithuanian uniion. Wladyslaw II was the founder of the new Jagiellon dynasty that bears his name, while pagan Jogaila was an heir to the already established house of Gediminids (Gediminid dynasty) in Grand Duchy of Lithuania; his royal dynasty ruled both states until 1572,and became one of the most influential dynasties in the late medieval and early modern medieval Central and Eastern Europe.

 

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | May 13, 2010

Saabor – Zabór in the past

Saabor_karte_gr.pg

Zabor is a former German village. It used to be called Saabor.

Saabor is also known as Saborin from 14c. Since 1553 the Tschammers family was the owner of Saabor’ areas. Saabor was shortly a city in 1556 but today it is a village.

There is a beautiful palace in Saabor. In 18c. it was owned by Cosel family, then Schönaich-Carolath family. Hermina (primo voto: von Schönaich-Carolath-Saabor; secundo voto: von Hohenzollern), the second wife of the last emperor of Germany -Wilhelm II,  was the last owner of the palace before World War II. She lived in the palace till 1945. 

Saabor is also known as Saborin from 14c. Since 1553 the Tschammers family was the owner of Saabor’ areas. Saabor was shortly a city in 1556 but today it is a village.

There is a beautiful palace in Saabor. In 18c. it was owned by Cosel family, then Schönaich-Carolath family. Hermina, the second wife of the last emperor of Germany -Wilhelm II,  was the last owner of the palace before World War II. She lived in the palace till 1945.

 HERMINE von REUSS
 (1887-1947)

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | May 13, 2010

Grunberg-Zielona Góra in the past

The city Zielona Góra is a former German town called Grunberg. Green Mountain is an English translation of its name. Here you can see some old pictures from this town.

the footpath to the city centre looking back towads the railway station

a view of the city from the vineyards.

Vineyards and wine production is a very important issue in our region. people for many years planted grapes and produced delicious wines.

a close-up of the vineyards Grunberg was once famous for in German times. In the background a panaroma of the city.

Grunberg from the Cathedral tower in the 1920s

– one of the many grand buldings Grunberg was once known for.

– Grunberg city hall in the early 1930s

Town hall in Zielona Góra, 1920

 

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | May 9, 2010

Sienkiewicz Street in Kielce

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Hello! Here is the longest street in Kielce. Sienkiewicza Street in Kielce is the main commercial and historic “artery” of the city of Kielce. It was built in the middle of the 19th century. It was originally called Konstantego Street, then Postal Street and in 1919 it received its present name. Shops and department stores are located there as well as historic buildings and monuments. It is approximately 1270 metres long and runs from the railway station situated next to the Independence square to the Moniuszki square. Look how it looked like in the past. Kasia.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | May 9, 2010

The City Park

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Hello! My name’s Ania. We would like to show you old photos of our city park. The park is located in the centre of the city. It’s a great place to relax. There is a pond, a fountain, a concert place, paths, flower beds, old trees and monuments, presenting Stefan Zeromski (our writer), Stanislaw Staszic (our scientist), St. Neupomucen. I like this place. Look at the old photos.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | May 6, 2010

Article 1 – about Grunwald (our project about the past)

Hello Dear friends from Europe!

We are celebrating the 600th anniversary of the Batlle of Grunwald this year. We decided to take part in a school programme which consists of different activities connected with this event. Our king prayed in the Holy Cross Monastery in the Holy Cross Mountains  before the battle(14 km. from our school), so now you know why we are very serious about it. We are going to prepare PowerPoint presentations, poems and pictures connected with Grunwald.

Battle of Grunwald

Part of the Polish-Lithuanian-Teutonic War
Grunwald bitwa.jpg
Battle of Grunwald, by Jan Matejko, 1878. Oil on canvas.
Date July 15, 1410
Location Between Grunwald (Grünfelde)and Stębark (Tannenberg), Poland
Result Decisive Polish-Lithuanian victory
Belligerents
Orzelek2.gif Kingdom of Poland
Herb Pogon Litewska.jpg Grand Duchy of Lithuania
Polish-Lithuanian vassals, allies and mercenaries:

  • Moldavia Principality of Moldavia
  • Tartars
  • Bohemians
  • Moravians
  • Russians (Ruthenians)
Den tyske ordens skjold.svg Teutonic Order and mercenaries and various knights from the rest of Europe
Commanders
Herb Jagiellonów.PNG Jogaila(Władysław II Jagiełło), supreme commander of the allied host
COA of Gediminaičiai dynasty Lithuania.png Vytautas the Great, commander of the Lithuanian army
Lengvenis, commander of the Russian banners from Smolensk
Jelal-el-din, Tatar commander, exiled Khan of the Golden horde
Teuton flag.svg Ulrich von Jungingen 
Grand Marshal Frederic von Wallenrode 
Grand Komtur Kuno von Lichtenstein
Strength
39,000-50,000 men 27,000-32,000 men
Casualties and losses
12 Polish knights, unknown number of other Allied knights 8,000 dead
14,000 captured

We are

Polish–Lithuanian–
Teutonic War
Posted by: Bozena Kraj | May 6, 2010

Karczowka monastery in Kielce

Hi! Tom here. This is Karczowka, a special place.The hill of Karczówka is a landscape and wood reserve covering the area of 27 ha. Dominating its top is a historic monastic complex founded by Bishop Marcin Szyszkowski as a votive offering in gratitude for the missing of Kielce by a plague raging in 1622. The church dedicated to St Charles Borromeo was erected in 1624-28, while in the years 1629-31 the monastery, designed for the Observants, was built. Since 1957 the parish and noviciate in the Karczówka premises have been conducted by the Association of Catholic Prozelytization – Pallotine Fathers. Inside the church, a particularly interesting is the early baroque main altar, made in Checiny marble, with pictures of the church’s patron saint and of St Casimir. In a rococo altar of a chapel there is a 17th century statue of St Barbara, patron saint of miners. The statue is made of unusual material – an enormous nugget of galena, or lead ore. The historic granary now accommodates a contemporary chapel of God’s Mother of Fatima.

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Posted by: Bozena Kraj | May 6, 2010

The Palace of Cracow bishops in Kielce

Hello again! I’m Ania. This time we would like to show you the palace in Kielce, now the National Museum. The main premises of the National Museum in Kielce is a palace that used to be a residence of Cracow bishops. The palace complex comes from the turn of the 17th century and is situated on the so called Castle Hill, in the centre of Kielce. The palace founded by Bishop Jakub Zadzik (1582-1642), is a unique work of architecture and style of the Vasa dynasty’s time.
Jakub Zadzik was a Deputy Grand Crown Chancellor and king’s advisor in the years 1627-1635, and from 1635 – Bishop of Cracow. The main building was erected in the years 1637-1644. The design of the Kielce palace is attributed to Thomas Poncino of Lugano, who also worked in Cracow, Lowicz, Warsaw and Jasna Gora.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | May 4, 2010

The amphitheatre and the reserve in Kielce

Hello! It’s me, Kate. I want to tell you about something very interesting. It is situated in the heart of the city where from the 17th century limestone rocks were being extracted. The usage of the quarry was finished in 1962. At the same time barriers were built to allow people walikng there in the midst of rocks. There were made several veiwing areas to admire the varied flora as well as the rocks.

When Kielce celebrated its nine hunddred anniversary of the foundation, on the occasion of that, in Kadzielnia The Amphitheatre was built to function as the perfect place for many different cultural events.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | May 4, 2010

The legend

According to a local legend, Mieszko, son of Boleslaus II of Poland dreamt he was attacked by a band of brigands in a forest. In the dream he saw a vision of Saint Adalbert who drew a winding line which turned into a stream. When Mieszko woke up, he found the Silnica River whose waters helped him regain strength. He also discovered huge white tusks of an unknown animal. Mieszko announced he would build a town and a church to St. Adalbert at that site. According to this legend, the town’s name Kielce commemorates the mysterious tusks (kieł in Polish).Greetings from Daleszyce and Kielce! Eva

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | May 4, 2010

Cathedral of the Ascension the Virgin Mary, Kielce

Our cathedral in Kielce

Hello! I’m Ania. We know that the church was built in 1171 by the Cracow Bishop Gedeon, after numerous reconstructions it finally took the form of an early Baroque three-nave church. At the cathedral square there is the grave plate of Wojciech Bartos-Głowacki, the Racławice hero, who died in Kielce 3 days after the battle of Szczekociny (6th June 1794). In the blind church portal there is an interesting monument from the Enlightement Period a marble board founded by the primate priest Michał Poniatowski in 1782. The board shows polish length, weight and area measurements as well as the basic model of the length measurement he Crown Elbow. There are also the models of the English and Paris feet on it. In the Cathedral you can visit the treasury on the first floor after the previous contact with the parish office. The treasury comprises valuable pieces of sacral art (the 16th and 17th-century manuscripts, old prints, liturgical utensils and clothes, the Gothic cup of 1362, the reliquary of 1270, the Kielce Antiphonary of 1372, the missal of the turn of the 15th C. and the old chasubles collection).

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | May 3, 2010

History of Paralia

Timeline of the history of Paralia

323 BC People live in Paralia, as excavations in 1981 showed.
14 BC People still live in Paralia, as Hellenistic and Roman findings in the area of our school showed.
551 AD A very strong earthquake hits Paralia. A big number of people also get sick and die.
1291 Three Byzantine churches are built in Rohetica.
1700 Mindilogli appears for the first time as Hrissavgi with 50 people.
1774 A wealthy man, Mindiloglou, gives his name to Mindilogli. It’s no longer called Hrissavgi.
1851 35 families live in Mindilogli.
1889 272 people live in Rohetica. Rohetica got its name from the Middle Ages town of Rogi in Epirus.
1903 786 people now live in Mindilogli.
1912 Mindilogli becomes an official community.
1922 People from Epirus, Asia Minor and the Ionian islands come to live in Paralia
1928 Rohetica becomes an official community.
1930 Goumenitsanika, a new neighbourhood, is created.
1936 Paralia gets electricity.
1947 Paralia becomes an official community with 500 people.
1951 955 people now live in Mindilogli.
1965 Another very strong earthquake hits and seriously damages many houses and buildings in Paralia.
1994 An ancient cottage is discovered with tools to make jugs for carrying wine.
1997 One of the biggest olive oil mills close while the other one belonging to the Karoubalos family continues, but now sells machine for extracting and producing olive oil.
1999 Paralia becomes the centre of the municipality of Paralia.
1999 Mindilogli becomes part of the Municipality of Paralia.

Dear pen pals on “My town in the old times”,

We have completed our studying of the history of our town, Paralia, and we would like to present it to you now in a Table. So, what you see above is a timeline of the history of Paralia, which as you can see has got quite a long history.

We hope you enjoy it because we worked very hard on it. It took us a lot of studying, asking, and researching!

Now we will stop posting information about the history of Paralia or Patra because we have to study for our end-of-year exams which start at the end of next week.

It was so nice being with you on this project this year! We hope to be together with you on another project next school year!

The students of Grade 2, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | May 3, 2010

English Mansions

The Crowe villa in the past

The Crowe villa today

The Morphy Villa in 1905

The Morphy villa today

The Pilcher and Morphy villas in the past

The Pilcher villa today

Paralia in the 1904's

The English Mansions are a number of countryside homes in an area from Ities to Monodendri (7- 11 kms outside Patra).

These homes belonged to English families who lived in Patra around 1902-1903 and had them as their holiday homes. Some of these English families were the Hancocks, the Morphys, the Pilchers, the Crowes, the Stevens, and one Greek family,  Kritikos.

These homes were abandoned as Patra grew bigger and traffic became heavier and the area was no longer a holiday place.

Today some of these homes have been renovated ans sold, but they are not used as holiday homes because the sea in the area is very dirty and nobody can swim there.

In the pictures above you can see what these mansions looked like in the past and what they look like today. You can also see what our town looked like in the beginning of the 20th century.

We found these wonderful pictures in a very nice book by Edith W. Morphy “Patra in the beginning of the 20th century” published in 2002 by Typorama.

Alexandra Koka, Grade 2, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 29, 2010

The old Arsakio school

The Arsakio school operated as a girls’ school in 1892 in a rented building. The rapid increase of the female students necessitated the finding of another building. The municipality of Patra after many efforts, built a school complex in the centre of the city in which lessons began on 21 October 1940.

With the outbreak of the Greek-Italian war the building housed public services. In 1949 it was turned into a hospital by the Germans. From 1945 until 2004 it operated as a school again and housed the Arsakia schools of Patra.

Today, this building is used as a cultural centre for the city of Patra housing many cultural events such as exhibitions, concerts, etc.

Joanna Photakia, Grade 2, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 29, 2010

The Mindiloglou castle

The Mindiloglou tower

The Mindiloglou castle in Mindilogli

This castle used to be the home of a Turkish bey called Mindiloglou, who was a big landlord of the area and gave his name to Mindilogli, one of the municipal districts of Paralia.

Today we can only see the ruins of this castle in the centre of Mindilogli.

Dennis Kalantzis, Grade 2, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | April 29, 2010

Our school Art contest inspired by Chopin’s music

Hello! Here we would like to show you our collection of pictures drawn and painted by our students in Daleszyce. Chopin’s music has inspired us so much. He was famous in the past but now he is much more.Hope you will like it?

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | April 29, 2010

Chopin – the 200th birthday anniversary

Hello! My name is Kate. Here are some facts from Chopin’s biography. Frédéric François Chopin, in Polish Fryderyk Franciszek Chopin, and is sometimes written Szopen in Polish; (1 March 1810– 17 October 1849), was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist. He is considered one of the great masters of Romantic music.Chopin was born in Warsaw, to a French-expatriate father and Polish mother. He was considered a child-prodigy pianist. Following the Russian suppression of the Polish November Uprising of 1830, Chopin settled in France. There he worked as a composer and piano teacher, giving few public performances. But he was missing Poland so much. Most of his compositions express those sad feelings, his love to Poland. For the greater part of his life Chopin suffered from poor health; he died of pulmonary tuberculosis in Paris, aged 39. Klara is playing Etude now, which can be played much faster as well.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | April 29, 2010

Chopin – tha composer of the past and the present

Hello. I’m Ania.I would like to tell you that Chopin was always important for Polish people. And in the past he was famous too, although not everybody could listen to his concerts, records. Now, we can listen. No obstacles. We are glad to say that our student Klara got the 4th reward ex aequo with 2 Polish boys after pianists from Japan, Vietnam and Lithuania at the International Chopin Piano Contest in Antonin. It was in February 2010. Here, she is playing Nocturne.

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 28, 2010

Timeline of the history of Patra

Dear friends on “My town in the old times”,

After studying for a very long time, we have finally put together and completed a historical timeline for Patra. We would like to present it to you now together with some historical pictures which we found either on the internet or in historical books such as the one by Stephanos Thomopoulos “The history of the city of Patra”.

We hope to help you get a quick and clear idea of the very long history of the area we live in.


3000 – 2001 BC The first people appear where today is Aroe
2000 – 1500 BC More people appear in another area of Patra.
1580 – 1100 BC Patra develops into a very rich and strong city.
419 BC The first castle is built in Patra
146 BC People of Patra are defeated in a battle at Scarpheia
31 BC A big battle between Anthony and Cleopatra and Augustus takes place in Aktium. Anthony and Cleopatra come to stay in Patra.
31 BC – 300 AD Patra flourishes and becomes a cosmopolitan city.
300 A strong earthquake hits Patra and it is seriously damaged.
551 Byzantine times Patra is ruined by another earthquake.
1204 Patra becomes the seat of the Latin Duchy and it is taken over by the Crusaders.
1387 Patra is again taken over by the Knights Hospitaller of Rhodes.
1408 The city comes under the occupation of Venice.
1428 Patra is taken over by Constantine and Theodore Paleologos.
1458 Patra is again taken over by Sultan Mehmed II.
1687 The Venetians capture Patras from the Ottomans.
1715 – 1799 Patra becomes a prosperous city again.
1821 – 1828 People of Patra and Achaia fight against the Ottomans.
1880 – 1899 Patra becomes the second largest city in Greece.
1894 The great raisin crisis.
1900 – 1920 Patra becomes a modern and prosperous city again.
1902 Patra becomes the first city to operate a tramline. – British merchants build beautiful mansions in northern European style known as “English mansions”, in Paralia.
1908 The foundations of the church of St. Andrew are laid.
1917 Tramline stopped operating.
1925 – 1927 The first significant hydroelectric project at Glafkos is completed.
1829 – date Patra becomes a significant port and cosmopolitan city.
1862 – 2000 Many big businesses and industries, such as Achaia Claus and Pirelli, operate in Patra.
1922 Patra accepts refugees from Asia Minor and Pontus.
1940 – 1944 Patra is attacked and occupied by the Italians.
1950 – 1959 A great number of factories operate now in Patra promoting its industrial development.
1927 – 1956 Construction of the port of Patra.
1961 A direct boat line between Patra and Italy is established.
1964 University of Patra is founded.
1983 The Techonological and Educational Institute of Patra is established.
1988 The university hospital opens.
1980 – date A lot of factories close down or move their plants away from Patra and Patra is hit by deindustrialisation.
1992 The Hellenic Open University, the first Greek state distance education university, is founded.
1992 – 1995 The port of Patra becomes one of the biggest ports in the Mediterranean Sea, mainly because of the Balkan War.
2004 The Rio-Antirrio cable bridge is completed and opens for the traffic.
2006 Patra becomes the Cultural Capital of Europe.
2009 The new archaeological museum of Patra is completed and opens to the public.

Coins of ancient Patra

Anthony and Cleopatra during their stay in Patra

Patra in 1650 by Marc Vincent Coronelli

Patra in the 17th century

Patra in the 1800s

St. Andrew Street

Othonos Street

Mezonos Street and King George I square

St. Nicholas Street

The students of Grade 3, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia


Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 28, 2010

Palamas’s home

Palamas's home in the centre of Patra

Costis Palamas was one of the most important poets and writers in Greece. He was born in Patra in 1859 and died in Athens in 1943. Here you can see a picture of him. He is the man in the middle holding his head with his hand.

His home in Patra was built in 1840. This is the place where he was born and lived with his family. Earlier, in 1856, the famous Italian writer Matilde Serao was also born and lived there until 1860.

Matilde Serao.jpg Matilde Serao

Today Palamas’s home is a historical monument.

Joanna Konstantaropoulou, Grade 3, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 28, 2010

Roman bridge

Roman bridge of Milihos

This Roman bridge was built in the 2nd and the 3rd centuries AD by Artemios Messateus. It was part of the famous Via Militariam which connected Patra with nearby Egio.

Dia Ritsikali, Grade 3, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | April 28, 2010

Our Comenius Visit – Italy

Hello! I’m Ania. Our students and 2 teachers, Mrs. Bozena Kraj among them, spent 5 days in Italy. A wonderful visit too. Portici, Pompeii, Nappoli, Sorrento and the visit in Vatican, Rome. Our school was at our Patron’s grave ; it was great as they said, so moving! Here we would like to show you Pompeii. (you have learnt about it, haven’t you?). And the other materials can be seen on our school page.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | April 28, 2010

Our Patron – John Paul II

Here you can see how we celebrated the 5th anniversary of his death. There you can see the first part.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | April 28, 2010

The woolen heads in “Biale Lugi”

Another interesting plant is a woolen head. White, soft and light. Wonderful. There are lots of white plants on the area of the reservoir “Biale Lugi”, which is famous in Europe. Look!

The reservoir (one of the unique landscapes)

The white heads

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | April 28, 2010

The reserve of “Biale Lugi”

Hello! My name is Kate. I would like to tell you about our special place, which is very rare. The reserve is called “Biale Lugi” and is situated close to Daleszyce. There are different plants and mosses among them. “Mosses are small, soft plants that are typically 1–10 cm (0.4-4 in) tall, though some species are much larger. They commonly grow close together in clumps or mats in damp or shady locations. They do not have flowers or seeds, and their simple leaves cover the thin wiry stems. What is it? Just look at the photo!

In the past - mosses

Posted by: annakrajcik | April 27, 2010

Our trip to London

Last week we came back from our five-day trip to London. We had a wonderful time there. We visited lots of famous places, for example The Houses of Parliament, Westminster Abbey, The Tower, Tower Bridge, Big Ben, Downing Street, Trafalgar Square, Buckingham Palace, Hyde Park and so on. We also went to  some museums – The British Museum, The National Gallery and Madame Tussauds. We took a lot of beautiful pictures, some of them you can see now. Enjoy them!

Have you ever been to London?

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | April 26, 2010

Our Holy Cross Mountains Region

It’s our region’s promotonal film below. We don’t like witches but some legends say that they were flying on their brooms over the forests. The Bald Mountain was the place of pagan cult.Yet, it was in the pagan times, Christianity came, the Holy Cross Monastery was built in the Holy Cross Mountains and everything changed for better. Our region is full of touristic attractions.

 

The Holy Cross Mountains - the Holy Cross Monastery

The Holy Cross Mountains - the Holy Cross Monastery

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | April 25, 2010

Our region – Swietokrzyskie Voivodship

Posted by: selinb | April 23, 2010

April 23th National Sovereignty and Children’s Day

                                    


, is one of the national holiday Republic of Turkey and Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus .This day was given for a festival and national  and public holiday  by Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, the founder and first president of Republic of Turkey  After WW1 In 1920 ,escaped deputies whom member the last Ottoman parliament distributed in occupatied  Istanbul and representatives from the various parts of Anatolia ,was formed , a council  together at Ankara April 23th .   be recovered of the land, from the occupation, launching and managing the national struggle  for freedom and to make the necessary arrangements for this purpose was aim of the National Assembly . M. Kemal Ataturk led the delegates. from that moment the country’s fate discussed by National Assembly and all ties cut, with the Sultan and  his managers  whom collaboration with , the occupation forces in İstanbul. the process continued, the national liberation war resulted in 1922 and  the declaration of the republic in 1923. From that day the National Independence Day aims  celebrating Opening of parliament, abolition of sultanate and give the rule and othority to the public  take from Ottoman Sultan which means sovereignty and that day the Children’s Day purpose  like a spring festival and gladden   for orphans and the poor children during the war.Turkey is the first state  in the world which gifts a holiday to their children . Later,  April 23th has been an international  festival by TRT (Public Television) paticipate  with whole world children and celebrating  with their Turkish friend.maybe some of your friends currently in Ankara for joining festival. Anyway…..happy holidays for all




Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 22, 2010

The Monastery of the Ascension of Jesus Christ

The Monastery of the Ascension of Jesus Christ is in Pavlokastro, a neighbourhood of Paralia.

Pavlokastro

Pavlokastro

It was built in 700 AD. It was built as a monastery by people from Kalavryta.

It played a very important role during the Greek revolution against the Turks in the 1800’s because it helped many people who were fighting the Turks to be saved from them.

Today it is not used as a monastery but only as a church where many functions and festivals take place.

Demetres Ritsikalis, Grade 2, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 22, 2010

How healthy is your diet?

Last week we did a survey about our how healthy our diet is.

The results were that 68% of the students eat meat, poultry, and fish, 55% of the students eat dairy products, 74% of the students eat grains.

These results are very good. We can continue like this and even better.

Elli Tzamakou, Grade 1, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 22, 2010

Our eating habits


Healthy lifestyle

Last week in our English class we had a lesson about healthy diet. After we finished the lesson, we did a survey and found that

  • 68% of the students sometimes or rarely eat meat, poultry, and fish
  • 55% of them sometimes or rarely eat dairy products
  • 31% of them rarely eat vegetables and fruits, and
  • 56% of them sometimes or rarely eat grains.

Catherine Polizou, Grade 1, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 22, 2010

Monastery of the Transfiguration of Our Saviour

The monastery of the Transfiguration of Our Saviour is in Mindilogli, one of the municipal districts of Paralia. It is very old. We don’t know exactly when it was built, but we know that it was built by the warriors of Kalavryta because they wanted a safe place to stay during the revolution against the Turks in 1821.

It was built over the ruins of an older byzantine church and it is said that people from the area used marble from the church to build their homes.

Today it is not used as a monastery, but only as a church.

George Makris, Grade 2, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 22, 2010

The archaelogical museum of Patra

Α9

The old archaeological museum of Patra

The archaeological museum of Patra is in function since 1936. It contains ancient statues like a statue of Athena, graves, and other findings from excavations in Patra and the areas around it.

The new archaeological Museum of Patra opened its gates to the public on 24 July 2009. The modern building was made by architect Theophanis Bobotis. Its is an admirable work which took years to complete.

It has got three big halls and a hall for temporary exhibitions. At the moment three of the four halls of exhibits are open to the public. These are the Hall of private life, the Hall of public life, and the Hall with the tombs, or necropolis, as it is called. It’s got seven different kinds of tombs from the prehistoric times and fourteen mosaics from the Roman times.

The theme of the temporary exhibition now on at the museum is “Plants in the history of Europe”.

We visit our museum because we love learning about the history of our town. The new archaological museum of Patra was built to satisfy our love and admiration of our history.

Alexandra Pouliagou, Grade 3, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia.

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 22, 2010

Psila Alonia square

patra psila alonia

Psila Alonia square in the old days

Psila Alonia square was built in 1881 by mayor Roufos and at the beginning it was named after him. Before that it was named as Arta’s square.

Its today’s name comes from its ancient use as a ground for growing raisin and because it was the highest place in Patra.

Exporting raisin at the port of Patra in the past

It was also inhabited since the ancient years as Roman findings have shown.

Today, Psila Alonia square is used for celebrations and other activities, for example, ice skating.

Elianna Tsami, Grade 3, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 22, 2010

Roman Nymphaeum

Ruins of a Roman Nymphaeum in the centre of Patra

According to dictionary.reference.com a nymphaeum was an ancient Greek and Roman sanctuary dedicated to water nymphs.

This Nymphaeum was built in the 3rd century BC by the Romans and it was used as a spa. Later, in the early Byzantine times, it was probably used as a church and later even as a cemetery.

Today it is a monument which stands as a beautiful ornament in the centre of Patra.

Elmira Spahiou, Grade 3, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 21, 2010

The Roman Aquedact

The Roman Aquedact of Patra in the 17th century from the book "The History of the City of Patra" by Stephanos Thomopoulos

Ruins of the Roman aquedact of Patra

The Roman aquedact was built by the Romans in 31 BC. The Roman aquedact was built because a lot of people lived in Patra at the time and they needed a lot of water for their everyday life.

Christina Gotsopoulou, Grade 3, Level 2, 2nd Jinor High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 21, 2010

Gerokomio monastery

Gerokomio monastery in the past

Girokomeio1.jpg

Girokomeio2.jpg

The Gerokomio monastery was built in 501 BC by the son of Constantinos the Great (St. Constantine) and General Artemios.

It was built as a monastery and it operates as such until today.

Lucy Kapsalou, Grade 3, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 21, 2010

Municipal Slaughter house of Patra

dimotika_sfageia.jpg 

The Municipal Slaughter house of Patra is on Akti Dymeon Ave. and dates back to 1903. Until about 1998 it was the municipal slaughter house of the city of Patra. It was built by architect George Lykoudis. Its new name is “Politia” (meaning “city” in Greek) and it is now used as a cultural centre.

Zafiria Farmaki, Grade 3, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia



Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 21, 2010

Etwinning in Greece celebrates its 5th birthday!

Etwinning Greece celebrates its 5th birthday on 5 May 2010 and invites all the people who are currently doing projects with Greek schools to write their birthday wishes on the following link:

http://www.etwinning.gr/5years/

So, we will be more than happy if you visit this site and write your wish, your name and school in the spaces provided as shown below. I’m not sure if this comes on in English, I hope it does. Anyway, you are more than welcome to follow the instructions shown below and write your wishes!

Instructions

Have loads of fun!

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | April 21, 2010

Polish answers for the Badalona’s quiz

Badalona’s Spanish Quiz- Polish answers

We liked your quiz very much. We hope we did it well. Your quiz was very interesting. Best regards for all. Students from class 3a from Zabór.
Milena, Kasia, Ania, Natalia, Ewelina, Weronika, Dominika, Sylwia, Agnieszka, Bartek, Sławek, Paulina, Kasia R and Natalia S.

Where can you find Spain?
C) In Europe

What colours are Spanish and Catalan Flags?
C) red and yellow

What city is the Spanish capital?
B) Madrid

Which is the official language in Spain?
C) Spanish

What’s the Spanish name in the roman times?
Hispania.

Who is the Spanish King
A) Juan Carlos I

What’s the typical animal from Spain?
B) Toro

Before we use the Euro, what’s the Spanish currency name?
C) Peseta

Who is the Spanish president?
C) Jose Montilla

The sea near Spain is called:
A) Mediterranean Sea

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | April 20, 2010

The past in the pictures

I have drawn our queen Jadwiga and a knight from Medieval Times. Magda

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 19, 2010

A report about our eating habits

Hello everybody! My name is Jim and I’m from Greece.

In our English class last week we did a survey about how healthy our diet is.

  • 68% of my class sometimes and rarely eat meat, poultry, and fish
  • 55% of my class sometimes eat dairy products
  • 43% of them always eat fruit, but 31% of them rarely eat, and
  • 56% of them sometimes eat grains.

Well, we found that our diet is very healthy but we must eat more grains.

Jim Kostopoulos, Grade 1, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of  Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 19, 2010

How healthy is your diet?

Hello children on “My town in the old times”!

My name is Tolis and I’m from the 2nd Junior High School of Paralia in Greece.

In our last English class we did a survey about how healthy is our diet.

We saw that our diet is healthy because

  • 68% of my class rarely and sometimes eat meat, poultry, and fish
  • 55% of my class rarely and sometimes eat dairy products
  • 54% of my class always and rarely eat vegetables and fruits

But we found that

  • 56% of my class sometimes eat grains.

We will be very happy to learn about your eating habits. Are they healthy or not?

Tolis Ritsikalis, Grade 1, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 19, 2010

A survey about healthy diet

We asked 16 children who are in Grade 1 of our school to find out what kind of food they like eating the most.

  • Children sometimes like to eat meat, poultry, and fish, but 6 children rarely eat meat.
  • Three children like to eat dairy products, but six of them rarely eat dairy products.
  • Seven children always eat vegetables and fruits.
  • Nine of them like to eat grains.

This report shows that my classmates prefer healthy food.

Akis Yahalis, Grade 1, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 19, 2010

A letter about healthy diet

Dear classmates in “My town in the old times”!

How are you? I hope you are well.

Last week we did a research at school because we wanted to see how healthy our diet is.

In my class we are sixteen students. Our English teacher asked us how often we eat food such as meat, poultry, fish, dairy products, vegetables, fruit, and grains. From our answers we saw that

  • 31% of my classmates sometimes eat meat, poultry, and fish, but 37% of them rarely eat this kind of food, while
  • 37% of the students rarely have dairy products, and 18% sometimes eat them
  • 43% always eat vegetables and fruit every day, but 31% rarely have them
  • 56% of us sometimes have grains

which are good for our health because they give us a lot of energy!

As we can see from this research, the students in my class don’t eat a lot of dairy products, meat, poultry, and fish. Also they always eat vegetables and fruit and they have a healthy diet.

What about you? Have you got a healthy diet? Pls write and tell us!!!

Elias Froudas, Grade 1, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: joanmolar | April 19, 2010

Badalona’s Spanish Quiz

Badalona’s Spanish Quiz

Here you can see our quiz about Spain. We have done it for you. We hope you will enjoy it.

  1. Where can you find Spain?

    A) In America. B) In Africa C) In Europe

  2. What colours are Spanish and Catalan Flags?

    A) red and green B) blue and yellow C) red and yellow

  3. What city is the Spanish capital?

    A) Barcelona B) Madrid C) Lisboa

  4. Wich is the official language in Spain?

    A) Catalan B) German C) Spanish

  5. What’s the Spanish name in the roman times?

    A) Hispania. B) Lutetia C) Helvetia

  6. Who is the Spanish King

    A) Juan Carlos I B) Jose Luis II C) C) Mariano IV

  7. What’s the typical animal from Spain?

    A) Bulldog B) Toro C) Tiger

  8. Before we use the Euro, what’s the Spanish currency name?

    A) Franc B) Cèntims C) Peseta

  9. Who is the Spanish president?

    A) Jose L. Zapatero B) José Maria Aznar C) Jose Montilla

  10. The sea near Spain is called:

    A) mediterranean sea B) North sea C) pacífic ocean

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | April 19, 2010

Droszków – a place where I live by Dominka Pietras

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 17, 2010

Church of Pantokratoras

Ναός Παντοκράτορα, Πάτρα

This byzantine church was built over the ruins of an ancient temple of Zeus in 900 AD and, with its 100 copper cupolas, it reminds of the church of Hagia Sophia in Constantinopolis (Instabul).

During the Turkish occupation it was converted into a mosque and it was used as a hospital in 1828 for the soldiers of the general Maison.

The church of Pantokratoras as a mosque during the Turkish occupation

The church of Pantokratoras, as it is today, was built after the liberation from the Turks and it was the first cathedral of Patra.

Theodore Koutroubanos, Grade 2, Level 1, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 17, 2010

How healthy is your diet?

Last week in our English class we did a survey about our eating habits.

I’m now going to present to you the results of this survey.

Of the sixteen people in my class,

  • one person always eats meat, poultry, and fish
  • three people often eat meat, poultry, and fish
  • five people sometimes eat meat, poultry, and fish
  • six people rarely eat meat, poultry, and fish, and
  • one person never eats meat, poultry, and fish.

Of the sixteen people in my class

  • two people always eat dairy products
  • five people often eat dairy products
  • three people sometimes eat dairy products, and
  • two people never eat dairy products.

Of the sixteen people in my class,

  • seven people always eat vegetables and fruit
  • three people often eat vegetables and fruit
  • one person sometimes eats vegetables and fruit, and
  • five people rarely eat vegetables and fruit.

Of the sixteen people in my class

  • two people always eat grains
  • three people often eat grains
  • nine people sometimes eat grains, and
  • two people rarely eat grains.

As we can see, our survey showed that we have got a healthy diet.

What about you? How healthy is your diet?

Joanna Panagaki, Grade 1, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia.

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 17, 2010

A report about healthy diet

Last week in my English class after the lesson we did a survey about healthy diet.

The results of this survey are:

a) a big number of students (68%) sometimes or rarely eat meat, poultry and, fish.

b) a very good number of students (55%) sometimes or rarely eat dairy products.

c) a number (not very good) of students (43%) always eat vegetables and fruits and another number (not very good, too) of students (31%) rarely eat vegetables and fruits.

d) a nice number of students (56%) sometimes eat grains.

These results aren’t very good, so our diet isn’t so healthy!

Roula Georgiou, Grade 1, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia.

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 16, 2010

How healthy is your diet?

Last week our class did a survey about the quality of the food that we eat.

Of the 16 students in my class, 3 students (18%) sometimes eat and 6 students (37%) rarely eat dairy products.

Of the 16 students (37%) in my class, 7 students (43%) always eat fruit and vegetables, but 5 students (31%) rarely eat fruit and vegetables.

In the end, of the 16 students in my class, 9 students (56%) sometimes eat grains.

John Lazanas, Grade 1, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 15, 2010

Dassylio

Dassylio (little forest, in Greek) is one of the most beautiful places in Patra.

It is located in the centre of the city and it is situated on a small hill. Due to its unique position, it has got an amazing view from a beautiful café which is called “Touristiko” (that’s Greek for “touristic”) and it is on the top of this hill.

Furthermore, Dassylio is a natural lung for our city as it has got a large number of pine trees. Some of them are really enormous. Moreover, Dassylio has got a lot of historical monuments making it a beautiful sightseeing place for every visitor.

I believe that our city is considered lucky due to the fact that it has got Dassylio!

Spyros Stragalinos, Grade 2, Level 1, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | April 15, 2010

Bartek – an old tree in swietokrzyskie

Bartek is an ancient oak tree in Poland. It grows in Zagnańsk near Kielce in the Świętokrzyskie Mountains. Its age, long estimated at up to 1200 years, has recently been established at 625 years, with a corer used to extract a sample for proper counting of the growth rings. There are three older oaks in Poland, though none so famous as Bartek.

File:Dab Bartek.jpg

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | April 14, 2010

Kadzielnia – a special geological reserve in Kielce

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

An old quarry, now geological reserve. Hello! I want to show you how this place has been changin for years. Look carefully! The result is amazing, isn’t it. Clara

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 14, 2010

Achaia Claus

Πάτρα, Achaia Clauss. Σημαντική βιομηχανική μονάδα και ένα από τα αξιοθέατα της Πάτρας. Ένας χώρος όπου μπορεί κανείς να απολαύσει από ψηλά την πόλη και τον Πατραϊκό κόλπο και να γνωρίσει στην ιστορία του ιδρυτή του εργοστασίου αλλά και του κρασιού.

Achaia Claus was built in 1861 by a man called Goustavos Claus. Firstly he had it as a second house. Then he decided to make his own wine and sell it to the people. He named his wine Mavrodaphni (Black Daphnae) after his fiancee. She had black eyes and died at a young age. Today it is one of the best wine production companies in Hellas.

Harry Katsiyiannis, Grade 2, Level 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 14, 2010

The Castle of Patra

Castle of Patra

Overview of the Castle of Patra

The Castle of Patra as it was depicted on a postcard at the beginning of the 19th century

The Castle of Patra was built during the 2nd half of the 6th century AD over the ruins of the ancient acropolis. It was manufactured by Justinian after the destroying earthquake of 551 AD for the protection of the area and of its inhabitants. We use it today as one of the most wonderful sights of Patra.

George Anastassopoulos, Grade 2, Level 1, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | April 13, 2010

Thank you dear friends for your condolences!

Thank you Agata for your quick information about our Polish tragedy. Yes, 96 great Polish people dramatically finished their live. They were people of great ideas. The President was a noble man devoted to Poland, its past and present. He wanted young generations to remember the past events like that of Katyn, were 20 thousand Polish soldiers of higher ranks had been killed by Soviets 70 years ago. Poland is mourning and praying. There were friends and people we met among them. We will miss them. We hope this lesson of patriotism taught by the President, his wife and the other noble men will never be forgotten.

Dear friends , thank you so much for your comments with the words of sympathy. Great, we are together.

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | April 13, 2010

Rio bridge

Rio AntiRio Bridge Elevation-fr.svg

Rio-Antirro bridge was built in 2004, on an idea by Harilaos Trikoupis.

The bridge is used for cars, motorbikes and lorries. The bridge is the way from Peloponnisos to central Greece.

It was built by a group of French engineers. Rio-Antirrio bridge is the longest suspension bridge in the world. Someone can still see dit from many places of Patra.

George Petroutsos, Grade 2, Level 1, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | April 10, 2010

The cathastrophy

Today during our lessons at school we heard the horrible news. We lost the top people in our country in a plane crash near Smolensk. The President was traveling to Russia to mark the 70th anniversary of the Katyn massacre of Polish prisoners of war. It’s a terrible tragedy for our country. We all feel sadness and pain in our hearts.

 The president Lech Kaczyński

 The First Lady Maria Kaczyńska

Itartass podaje, że od maszyny oderwał się ogon

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | April 9, 2010

Hello again!

The area of Daleszyce Commune is very big – 220 square kilometres. It is one of the biggest in the region of Kielce. 15 thousand people live here. It’s interesting to add that at least half of Daleszyce Commune is covered by beautiful forests, most of which are pine ones.

e have been very busy lately. After coming back from Italy we had to write articles, upload films, photos etc. – lots to do.  And now about Daleszyce.

Posted by: selinb | April 3, 2010

Hi !, Seagull from istanbul Salute you !!

Seagull salute you !!, she wanted  to tell a  very old story about Galata Tower and  First aviator man in the world 
Hezarfen Ahmed Celebi which she heard that  from her grand mother also grand mother knew the story from her grand mother. We will  tell the story for her,Do you want to join us ?



Galata Tower


The nine-story tower is 66.90 meters tall (62.59 m without the ornament on top, 51.65 m at the observation deck), and was the city’s tallest structure when it was built. The elevation at ground level is 35 meters above sea-level. The tower has an external diameter of 16.45 meters at the base, an 8.95 meters diameter inside, and walls that are 3.75 meters thick.


There is a restaurant and café on its upper floors which commands a magnificent view of Istanbul and the Bosphorus. Also located on the upper floors is a nightclub which hosts a Turkish show. There are two operating elevators that carry visitors from the lower level to the upper levels. Entrance to the tower costs 10 TL (Turkish Lira).

History


The tower was built as Christea Turris in 1348 during an expansion of the Genoese colony in Constantinople. It was the apex of the fortifications surrounding the Genoese citadel of Galata. The current tower should not be confused with the old Tower of Galata, an original Byzantine tower, named Megalos Pyrgos, which controlled the northern end of the massive sea chain that closed the entrance to the Golden Horn. That tower was on a different site and was largely destroyed during the Fourth Crusade in 1204.

The upper section of the tower with the conical cap was slightly modified in several restorations during the Ottoman period when it was used as an observation tower for spotting fires.

According to the Seyahatname of Ottoman historian and traveller Evliya Çelebi, in circa 1630-1632, Hezarfen Ahmet Çelebi flew as an early aviator  using artificial wings for gliding from this tower over the Bosporus to the slopes of Üsküdar on the Anatolian side, nearly six kilometres awayEvliyâ Çelebi also tells of Hezarfen’s brother, Lagari Hasan Çelebi, performing the first flight with a rocket in a conical cage filled with gunpowder in 1633.

Starting from 1717 the Ottomans began to use the tower for spotting fires in the city. In 1794, during the reign of Sultan Selim III, the roof of the tower made of lead and wood and the stairs were severely damaged by a fire. Another fire damaged the building in 1831, upon which a new restoration work took place. In 1875, during a storm, the conic roof on the top of the building was destroyed. The tower remained without this conic roof for the rest of the Ottoman period.

Many years later, in 1965-1967, during the Turkish Republic, the original conical cap was restored. During this final restoration in the 1960s, the wooden interior of the tower was replaced by a concrete structure and it was commercialized and opened to the public.

Hezârfen Ahmed Çelebi was a legendary Ottoman of 17th-century Istanbul, purported to have achieved sustained unpowered flight.

Alleged flight


The 17th century writings of Evliyâ Çelebi relate this story of Hezârfen Ahmed Çelebi, circa 1630-1632:

“First he practiced by flying over the pulpit of Okmeydani eight or nine times with eagle wings, using the force of the wind. Then, as Sultan Murad Khan (Murad IV) was watching from the Sinan Pasha mansion at Sarayburnu, he flew from the very top of the Galata Tower and landed in the Doğancılar square in Üsküdar, with the help of the south-west wind.

Then Murad Khan granted him a sack of golden coins, and said: ‘This is a scary man. He is capable of doing anything he wishes. It is not right to keep such people,’ and thus sent him to Algeria on exile. He died there”.[1]

The title Hezârfen, given by Evliyâ Çelebi to Ahmed Çelebi, means “a thousand sciences” (polymath). Evliyâ Çelebi also tells of Hezarfen’s brother, Lagari Hasan Çelebi, flying a gunpowder fueled rocket in 1633.


Posted by: agatawaltrowska | March 30, 2010

Easter traditions in our school by Adam Rudkowski

Easter (Pascha) – is one of the most important Christian holiday commemorating the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. It’s  celebrated on the first Sunday after the first spring full. Tomorrow our class will take part in celebrating of Easter traditions. Tomorrow we are going to have an Easter breakfast with our school mates and teachers.

!!!RUDY!!!

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | March 30, 2010

The history of a Napoleon’s Oak

Oak Napoleon (Napoleon Oak) – Polish thickest oak. It grows on the slope of the Oder valley just 3 km east of the partition (District green). Its circumference is 1 043 cm (at a height of 1.3 meter). Height 22 m, it is estimated that oak acorn was approximately 1,300 years (the age at 660-700 years). The tree has in the middle of a huge nest, which can accommodate several people at once. 

I think that this oak is very old. It is a little bit damaged because people tried to burn it. But even though it is still beautiful. In June together with our teachers we are going on the trip to visit it.

Zioło =)

 

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | March 28, 2010

The Lighthouse of Patra

Demetres Dalavouras, Grade 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | March 28, 2010

Oblos Monastery

Oblos Monastery in the old days and today

Oblos monastery is a very old building. It was built in 1189 by Arvanites, people from Albania. Oblos monastery was built because the Christians wanted to pray to God.

Today it is used as a monastery with 8 monks.

I feel excited because I have visited the monastery twice in the past, when I was 8 and 10 years old.

Demetres Ritsikalis, Grade 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | March 28, 2010

St. Constantine’s church

St. Constantine's church in Saravali

This historical church was built in 1689 by George Demenikas, a very rich landlord of the area at the time, to honour Constantine XI Palaiologos, who was one of the greatest Greek leaders.

Constantine XI Paleologos (February 8, 1404 – May 29, 1453)

According to a legend, Constantine XI Paleologos stayed in the area in 1425.

It has always been a church and it is still used as a church today. Every year on 21 May, St. Constantine’s nameday, there is a big celebration and festival here.

Constantine Stavropoulos, Grade 3, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | March 24, 2010

King George I square

King George I square at the beginning of the 20th century

plateia_georgiou.JPG

King George I square today

The square of King George I is in the centre of Patra. This is where most of the activities and shopping take place. Around the square there are many modern and neoclassical buildings among which the Apollo theatre and the National Bank of Greece.

This square was designed to be the centre of Patra according to the plans of architect Stamatis Voulgaris in the middle of the 19th century. Its original name was Otto Square to honour the first king of Greece. Then it changed its name to National Square and finally to King George I Square in 1875, when George I became king of Greece.

In the 19th and 20th centuries this is where all public events and open balls were held in Patra.

Today this is also where demonstrations and carnival events take place.

Marilena Konomi, Grade 3, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | March 23, 2010

Quiz about Lubuskie region from students from Zabor

Quiz about Lubuskie region

Made by students from class 1a



1       In which Zabór got city rights?

2        From what period comes Palace in  Zabór?

3       What geographic location has Zabór?

4        From which century does the church of St. Jadwiga in Milsko come?

5     Who was the first owner of the palace in Przytok?

6       From which century does the Palace in Przytok come?

7 What is the original German name of the village Zabór?

8 What is the name of the river near Zabór?

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | March 19, 2010

Communication habits

One week ago our class made a research about how the students communicate with their friends and relatives.

The students who participated were twelve. The biggest number of students said that they communicate with their friends and relatives, and the majority of the class said that they communicate by sms, while half of the class said that they communicate by telephone. Three out of twelve students said that they like chatting on Facebook, and two students by e-mail. One of the students said that they communicate face to face with their friends and relatives. Most of the students said that they often communicate with friends and relatives, while one of the students said that they always communicate with their friends and relatives.

To the question “why do you communicate”, seven students answered “to tell them our news”, two “to find out how they are”, and two students answered “because it’s a special day”.

To the final question “how do you show your friends and relatives that you love and care for them”, five students said that they hug and kiss them, three said that they buy them their favourite present, three that they buy them flowers, three that they just phone them, and two that they buy them chocolate candies.

Dennis Kalantzis, 2nd Junior High School of  Paralia

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | March 19, 2010

An important event in our school history

Hello! We have just come back from Italy. It’s our Comenius project.We spent 5 days in Portici, Sorrento, Pompeii, Nappoli, Vatican. We prayed at John Paul II’s grave in Vatican – it’s something very important for our school and Daleszyce history. Look – Here we are : Alina and Joanna and out teacher Bozena Kraj is recording (as usual).Bye!

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | March 16, 2010

Polish Quiz

Quiz about Polish history

 

  1. Who  wrote  the Polish national anthem ?
  2.   Who  was  Mieszko I ?
  3. When did the Warsaw Uprising begin ?
  4. What countries took part in the Battle of Grunwald ?
  5. When were the national flag colours officially adopted ?
  6. What is an archaeological fortified settlement in north-central Poland from an Iron Age ?
  7. When was the first Polish Constitution announced ?
  8. What is the name of the First Marshal “ and “ the authoritarian leader of the Second Polish Republic ?
  9. What is Irena Sendler famous for ?
  10.  10.  Where is located the Warsaw Rising Museum ?

 

 We did it! :))))

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | March 9, 2010

Communication habits

Hello everybody on “My town in the old times”.

Today we’re looking at how the people in my class communicate with their friends and families.

The people in my class who communicate with friends and family, communicate by telephone, sms, e-mail, by chatting on FB, MSN, etc, with games and by talking to them face to face.

Most of my classmates communicate by sms. Most of them often communicate with their friends and families. They communicate to find out how they are, to tell them their news, to learn their news, or because it is a special day (eg, nameday, birthday, public or religious holiday). Most of them communicate to tell them their news.

Most of my classmates hug and kiss their friends and family to show them their love and care for them.

Some of them buy them their favourite present or they buy them chocolate candies, flowers, or just phone them.

My classmates communicate with their friends and families because they love them. What about you? Why do you communicate with your friends and family?

Demetres Ritsikalis, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | March 9, 2010

Communication habits

Hi,

I would like to talk to you about my communication and socialising habits.

I always communicate with my family but I don’t speak on the phone over one minute.

Most of the time I speak with them about my getting back home or how I’m doing at school.

I like to show my love for my family and I do everything they want me to. I also buy their favourite present with my uncle, John.

My parents don’t want anything special from me, only for me to become a better person and to be successful in my life.

What about you? How do you show your parents that you love and care for them?

Stavros Kanelakopoulos, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | March 9, 2010

We have an eTwinning meeting right now!

Hello from our eTwinning meeting. We are making a historical quiz.

    

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | March 9, 2010

Class survey

Dear keypals,

I often wondered how important and possible it is to keep contact with my friends and relatives. When we worked on the song I just called to say I love you by Stevie Wonder in our English class, we had the opportunity to do a small but dynamic survey.

This survey showed that most of the pupils in our class communicate with their friends and relatives. 50% of them communicate by telephone. Most of them communicate by sms. Fewer communicate by e-mail. 24% keep contact by chatting on FB, MSN, and Skype. 4 of them believe that the best is to talk face to face.

Few of them communicate sometimes but quite a few say that they communicate with them often. Some of my classmates say that they communicate with them rarely.

We also asked our classmates about the way they show that they love their friends and family. A small number said that they buy them chocolate candies. 24% of them said that they buy them a present or that they send them a card, but 40% hug and kiss them.

In conclusion, I want to say that this research showed how we communicate with our friends and relatives. It also showed how we show our love to them.

What about you? How do you communicate with your friends and family? How often do you communicate with them? How do you show them that you love and care for them?

Demetres Dalavouras, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | March 9, 2010

Romeo and Juliett – a school play in Zabor

We had a group work during the Polish lesson. We had to create real sculptures. Here you can see pictures from our work.

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | March 9, 2010

Class survey

We recently made a survey in our English class to find out the social and communication habits of today’s young people.

In my class many of my classmates communicate with their friends and relatives by sms and MSN.

The way technology (internet) is developing I don’t think there’s much we can do to prevent people from texting or chatting on the internet. They don’t do it on purpose.

We communicate with our friends and relatives to learn their news or to tell them our news.

Teenagers prefer texting. I think that older people like our parents etc communicate face to face with the people they love and show their love by buying them flowers or chocolate candies. It’s better.

I believe that in a few years’ time lots of people will be using another way to communicate. I don’t know what it will be!!

Teenagers will be learning their lesson. Because mobile phones and the internet stop us from communicating face to face with the people we love! We must always see our relatives!

What do you think? Do you agree with me? I would very much like to know your opinion on this subject!

Alexandra Pouliagou, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: joanmolar | March 9, 2010

Snow in Badalona

Climate is changing. You can see it. This is not Poland or Slovakia. This is Spain. This is Badalona. Badalona is near the Mediterranian sea. Our school is near the sea too. We have got a big snow. This video was filmed yesterday, march, 8th in the school playgrounds. The climate is changing, isn’t it?.  I think so.

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | March 8, 2010

Let’s make a historical quiz!!!

Hello everybody!!!

We have an idea to make a historical quiz  about our countries and our regions. 10 questions for each cathegory. So 10 questions about eg Poland and 10 questions about our region Lubuskie Province. What do you think about this??? Do you like our idea??? All the countries have to do the same. We’re looking forward for your answers.

Greetings from Zabór

Students and Mrs Agata

Here our students want to show you and friends from Europe our traditional Polish dance. Maybe we can encourage you to take part in another eTwinning project which starts in March “Eurodance”. 

Wikipedia says:

The polonaise (Polish: polonez, chodzony; Italian: polacca) is a slow dance of Polish origin, in 3/4 time. Its name is French for “Polish.” The notation alla polacca on a score indicates that the piece should be played with the rhythm and character of a polonaise (e.g., the rondo in Beethoven’s Triple Concerto op. 56 has this instruction).

Look!

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | February 23, 2010

Coat of Arms of Zielona Góra

Coat of Arms

Flag 

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | February 23, 2010

About Zielona Góra

The city with a history going back to the 13th century is situated in the very centre of Europe, between Berlin, Wrocław, Szczecin, Poznań and Prague.

 

Tourists visiting our city will surely find many attractions here. The city boasts abundant history and tradition. The Wine City certainly has a unique atmosphere. The picturesque Old Town, the Wine Hill with the Palm House, many monuments connected with the history of our city and the omnipresent grapevine motif make the city visitors immediately captivated by the charm of this place.

There are many places in our town worth seeing. There are characteristic 19th century tenement houses in the Old Town, i.e. around the Market Square and in the streets leading to it. The Old Town has retained its layout without any significant changes since the 18th century. The Market Square was set out on a rectangular plan (60 x 160 m). Flower girls of Zielona Góra have taken a particular liking to this place. In summer the nearby restaurants and pubs have their outdoor beer gardens there. In the centre of the Old Town there is the Town Hall dating from the second half of the 15th century. Its 54-metre-high tower is crowned by a three-storey baroque helmet. The Town Hall houses, among others, the Register Office, City Council Meeting Hall and Chamber of the Pioneers of Zielona Góra.

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | February 21, 2010

Patra’s Carnival

Patra’s carnival is the biggest carnival event in Greece. It counts 160 years of history. This year the events began on January 17 and lasted until “Clean Monday”, on 15 February. The carnival of Patra is not a single event but a series of events that include dances, parades, treasure hunt, which counts 40 years of history, and many other things. It culminates on the last weekend of carnival with a big parade on Saturday night, in which all the members of the various groups participate walking and dancing through the streets of  Patra, the spectacular parade of floats and large crews on Sunday and the ritual burning of the Carnival King at the pier of St. Nicholas in the port of Patra.

Characteristic principles are:  spontaneity, improvisation, the source of inspiration, and volunteering.

Joanna Fotakia, Grade 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: joanmolar | February 18, 2010

Espriu school’s carnival

Last 12th february we have celebrated our Carnival at school. The King Carnival has came to the school. All the students have dressed us to make a rua into the school’s  neighborhood. Every year we dressed up with a different costume. This year we were dressed as a skiers. The teachers have dressed as a skier too. See our photos. You acn see our class in carnival. We enjoy the carnival very much!. Written by Adrian Roig and Alex Berral.

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | February 17, 2010

Patras Carnival

Every year at Patras Carnival I’m very happy. I want to dress up and wear funny costumes. The whole of Patras this period is decorated with ornaments.

Image

Children decorating the wall of their school for the Carnival.

People go out and eat, drink and have fun. The Carnival spirit makes you happy and … crazy! You want to run, dance and sing. At school we make funny masks. We love them.

Me and all my friends and relatives choose costumes from the various groups. After that we put on our costumes and we start running, with all the other people, in the streets. This time of the year you don’t think about anything else. You only think of having fun. After the big parade of Carnival Saturday night, we go to a club and we drink, sing and dance … again. I love Patras Carnival!!

Come with us to have fun! We would love to have you here with us!

Alexandra Pouliagou, Grade 2, 2nd Junior High School of  Paralia.

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | February 12, 2010

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Happy Valentine’s Day from all students form Secondary School in Zabor!!!

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 12, 2010

Our John Paul II High School- its present and its past

Here is our school presentation. Some slides are ne, some are older. Here is our past and present time.

 

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | February 11, 2010

Me in the Patras Carnival

One of the things which my town is famous for is its carnival, which is my favourite celebration.

Every year many people from all over the country come to Patra to enjoy the carnival festival.

Every year I participate in the carnival parade. To take part in the parade I must dress up like all the other members of the group. This year I am going to put on a cartoon costume.

Moreover, I take part in the Treasure Hunt where we play interesting games and we search for information to gain points. it’s really exciting!!!

For me Patras Carnival is the best in the worldbecause everybody has great fun!!!

I wish it was carnival every day!!!

George Makris, Grade 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | February 11, 2010

The Carnival of Patra

Hello dear keypals on “My town in the old times“,

It’s carnival time now and we want to show you how we feel and what carnival in Patra, the carnival capital of Greece and perhaps Europe, means to us. Did you know that the carnival of Patra is the biggest and the second oldest in Europe? It is about 200 years old and it is younger than the carnival of Venice, which is 700 years old, but we think it is as fabulous!!! Look at our drawings and texts below and you’ll see what we mean!!!

If you want to read and see more about our Carnival you can always visit this site: http://www.carnivalpatras.gr

Have loads and loads of fun!!!

Alexandra Koka

Dennis Kalantzis

Gina Bazaroglou

The students of Grade 2, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 9, 2010

Old legends about Daleszyce

Hello! I’m Clare. There are some legends connected with a mountains situated in Daleszyce. One of them says that there was a deep hole where a box full of silver and gold had been hidden. It is said that if you can see 3 bushes of hazel nuts: with white, yellow and green leaves, you must dig there to find the treasure. Do you believe it? Nobody has found the box yet.

Maybe it is still waiting for you to find it!!!

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 9, 2010

Old seals of Daleszyce

Hi! I’m Bartek. I want to show you how old seals of our town Daleszyce looked like.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 9, 2010

Karczowka – a place to find silence on.

Hello. Look. This is a wonderful place in Kielce. The 17th-century Saint Charles Borromeo church and Pallottines monastery on a hill Karczowka . The church was built as a gift to God for saving the city of Kielce from a serious sickness. A lot of missionaries in the world are Pallottines from Kielce, too. Greetings from Daleszyce.Ania

Hello! We have wonderful news for you. Remember, our mountains are thought to be the oldest in Europe. Lately a great discovery was done about 40 km. from Daleszyce. Grzegorz Niedźwiedzki, a student of Biology, has discovered and described the earliest tetrapod tracks. The science magazine Nature of 7th January publishes a paper „Tetrapod trackways from the early Middle Devonian of Poland” describing fossilized tracks of earliest tetrapod vertebrates that roamed the land. The traces, found in Zachełmie quarry in southern Poland, are by ca. 20 mln years older than any other similar tracks known to date. Look at the photo!Here you can see the traces of tetapods and the 2 young men who discovered them.

This is how this tetrapod looked like.

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | February 6, 2010

Barbecue Thursday

Every year on the Thursday one and a half weeks before Carnival Sunday and Clean Monday we celebrate “Barbeque Day”. On this day we eat only meat on coal, we drink, sing, dance, and we are very happy. In this way we mark the beginning of lent for Easter which lasts for about 50 days. We start fasting meat from the Friday after Barbeque Thursday and then we fast all dairy products (milk, cheese, eggs, butter, etc) on the Sunday before Carnival Sunday until on Clean Monday when the Easter fast starts. On Clean Monday we eat only bread, olives, legumes, and seafood. We have very big traditional celebrations on Clean Monday, too, and of course we have NO SCHOOL!!!!

On Barbeque Day in Patra we have a lot of celebrations with traditional music,  dances and traditional theatre in the streets and everywhere. People dress up in fancy and funny costumes and play jokes, sing and dance all over the city!

In the pictures above you can see what happened in Patra on Barbeque Thursday, which was last Thursday, 04/02/2010.

This year we also celebrated Barbecue Thursday at our school. The weather was beautiful. Almost like spring! The students of Grade 3 prepared meat on coal for all the students and the teachers and we had a lot of fun! You can get an idea of what happened at our school last Thursday from the pictures below.

Meat ready to be put on the coal!!!

Lots of drinks and music!!!

Souvlaki (kebab) deliciously cooked on coal!!!

Students of Grade 3 in action!!!

Teachers and students at our BBQ Thursday 2010 celebration

Teachers and students ready to taste the delicious meat!!!

Barbara Koziori with Grade 3 students in action!!!

Well, we hope you enjoyed our presentation about our Barbecue Thursday. We’re busy with our Carnival preparations now and we’ll soon tell you more about it. For the time being, let us tell you that the carnival of Patras is the most famous carnival in Greece and, maybe, Europe!!!

What about you? Do you have any celebrations like that in your country or in your city?

Posted by: joanmolar | February 5, 2010

Iberian people

The Iberian people lived well. Women gathering food and remained at home caring for children. The men went to hunt for food. Men and women practiced agriculture. The Iberians objects are iron made. They are really good working gold and metals. They also made good statues. We have found beautiful iberian manufactured jewelry. The Iberians existed before the Romans in the fourth century BC. The Iberians lived in the hills. They build there their houses. The largest house was the king’s house. It looks like a castle. The other houses are normal. Writen by Anthony.

Posted by: joanmolar | February 3, 2010

Pace day

Last 30th January we’ve celebrated the Pace Day at school. We make some logo about Pace. We make a world wars map and a big Pace bird. We hope all wars in the world will finish yet. Write by Clara García.


Posted by: joanmolar | February 3, 2010

Catalonia’s flag

Catalonia has a lot of history. Catalonia starts the IX century when Charlemagne appointed a warrior who was the King of Catalonia.His name’s Wilfred of Carcassonne. One day in a war with swords, an enemy arrow struck him in the body. King Charlemagne will remove the arrow. He put his four fingers in the wound and we went through the shield, which was yellow. So did our flag, that of Catalonia. Written by Lydia.


Posted by: Bozena Kraj | January 30, 2010

Something about the past! – Video from Daleszyce

Hello! It’s me Clara again. We have a nice video with 3 songs sung by our students from Daleszyce. They are about the past – the second world war. The video was recorded on the 1st of September – in the 70th anniversary of the war. The monument is devoted to the soldiers and scouts who died in the area of Daleszyce fighting against the German occupants. The area of Daleszyce, full of forests was very brave, some soldiers are still alive and well, you can see them in the green uniforms. It’s really important to celebrate  such events for the new generations to remember. Please, watch it and I hope you will like the music and the Polish language. We didn’t have much time to prepare singing, because it was just after summer holidays.

Posted by: joanmolar | January 29, 2010

Iberian an Greek people

The Iberians were the tribe who lived in Badalona and the Mediterranean coast. They are our antecesors. One day the Greeks came to trade with them. Were two camps: one in Empuries (Emporion) and the other Roses (Rhode). The colonies were Greek cities that were far away from the city where they lived and where they came from the Greeks. The Greeks go away from their Polis and would live forever where they came. The Greeks when they come to Catalonia to negotiate with the Iberians. Greeks gave with them grain, wheat, etc … The Iberians sold to them gold, silver, bronze and copper. The Iberians lived in villages above the mountains, on the hills. A few days ago we went to the Boscà hill to vit an Iberian settlement.

Writen by Adrià, Antonio and Alex

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | January 28, 2010

Hello from Zabor after winter break!

Hello everybody!

Lots of new post and videos we must see! We has been absent recently, because we had 3 weeks of winter holidays. It was very cold and it is pretty cold and snowy right now.

But we are getting back to school on Monday and we will join you again. Thanks for all comments for us 🙂

Students and teachers from Zabor

PS

Zielona Góra in winter 2010

Piękna zimowa Zielona Góra

Piękna zimowa Zielona Góra

Zima w Lubuskiem

Zima w Lubuskiem

Zima w Lubuskiem

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | January 27, 2010

We have winter holidays in Daleszyce now

Hello! It’s Klara. Now it’s a winter break. We are not at school amd enjoy winter and snow. Daleszyce looks great. Our villages look great too. Today we have pictures drawn by us to look, but we will have photos too. Listen to Vivaldi’s music “Winter”

Posted by: joanmolar | January 27, 2010

We go to the Iberian hill

On Wednesday 20 January 2010, we went to the hill forest to work about the Iberian people. The Iberians were the men and women who lived before us in Catalonia. Were in the old ages. The Iberians were conquered by the Romans.
When the Romans conquered they, the Romans said: Who wants to be Roman anything will happen he.
Those who do not want to be Roman will be exterminated.
Well continue with the tour. We climb the hill on foot. It is behind the school and it’s 357 meters high. When we were at the hill’s top, we breakfast and saw the Iberian settlement. When we returned to school we play football.

Posted by: joanmolar | January 27, 2010

Barcelona’s Rambla

Barcelona’s Rambla is an avenue. It’s a good place to walk away. If you don’t have to do anything you can go walking to Rambla. There are some people that gets some money doing the human monuments. You can see it in the picture. If you give them a coin they dance. Rambla’s avenue it’s OK to go walking with your family, all you togheter.


Posted by: Barbara Koziori | January 23, 2010

Vassilopita

Vassilopita is one of our traditional cakes. We make it on New Year’s day to celebrate the New Year. Vassilopita used to be a way of sharing out money. Saint Basil used to share out money to the poor secretly. He used to hide jewellery and money into bread. In this way, he was helping the poor and giving them hope.

Have you got any New Year’s Eve or Day custom?

Dia Ritsikali, Grade 3, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | January 23, 2010

Vassilopita (Saint Basil’s or New Year’s cake)

Every New Year’s day my mother and I make our family’s vassilopita. It has butter, sugar, flour, and eggs. We put money in it and the person who finds it, is the lucky one for the new year. This custom was started by Saint Basil, Archbishop of Caesarea, and so this cake got its name after his name. We celebrate his nameday on 1st of January every year.

Marilena Konomi, Grade 3, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | January 23, 2010

Vassilopita

Ingredients

  • flour
  • 1 cup orange juice
  • 6 eggs
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup walnuts
  • 1 cup milk
  • 3 portions of vanilla essence

Vassilopita is a traditional cake we make for the new year. Inside the cake we put one coin. The person who finds it will be the lucky one of the new year. In the old days rich people put inside the cake jewellery and coins to help poor people.

Elmira Spahiou, Grade 3, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | January 23, 2010

New Year’s cake

The traditional sweet for the 1st of January in Greece is a cake. We make this sweet for good luck. It’s very delicious and it has got a brown colour. The ingredients are: sugar, flour, milk, orange juice, butter, vanilla essence, and cogniac. Finally, we garnish it with sugar and dark chocolate.

Joanna Konstantaropoulou, Grade 3, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | January 23, 2010

Our New Year’s cake (vassilopita)

In Greece, we have a traditional cake which we eat when the year changes. It is very tasty and everyone likes it. In the cake there is a coin. When someone finds this coin, he or she will be lucky for one year.

The story about the new year cake has been alive for ages. Many many years ago Saint Basil, who was very rich, put jewellery and coins in the cake to help the poor people. Sain Basil’s name in Greek is Aghios Vassilis and that’s why we call our New Year’s cake “vassilopita” (pita is Greek for pie or cake)!.

Below you can see all the ingredients for this cake:

  • 250 gr butter
  • 1 cup of sugar
  • 4 eggs
  • 500 gr flour
  • 2 portions of vanilla essence
  • 1 cup of orange juice
  • 500 gr milk
  • icing sugar
  • some liquer

In the photos below you can see our school’s New Year’s cakes. We had one for the teachers and one for the students. We cut them on Thursday, 21/01/10.

Our school's New Year's cake for the students

Our school's New Year cake for the teachers

Some of our teachers at our vassilopita cutting

Christina Gotsopoulou, Grade 3, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | January 22, 2010

Old Daleszyce – pictures drawn by an artist

Hello! It’s Clare again. Can you see the old houses in the pictures. I wonder if we can draw similar showing the oldest houses in the town of Daleszyce. I hope to write more about them in the future.

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | January 22, 2010

Vassilopita (New Year’s Cake)

Vassilopita is a traditional cake that we make on New Year’s Eve. It is made of sugar, butter, flour, and eggs. We put in it a coin and the person who finds it will be lucky for the whole of the new year.

Our school's vassilopita

For the whole of January we cut vassilopitas at schools, clubs and associations. Yesterday, we cut our own new year’s cake (vassilopita) at our school. We had a very nice ceremony in which our priest from our church blessed our vassilopita and the headmaster gave a present to the lucky students and the the lucky teacher who found the coin. Our headmaster also gave a prize to one of our classmates who did not miss school at all last year. We were all so very happy!!!

The priest from our local church blessing our vassilipita (new year's cake)

Eliana Tsami, Grade 3, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | January 22, 2010

The New Year’s cake (Vassilopita)

The New Year’s cake is a traditional cake that started when Saint Basil the Great, Bishop of Caesarea (Kayseri, in Turkish), put money in pieces of bread and gave them to the poor to help them.

Saint Basil the Great

Nowadays we eat this cake on New Year’s Eve. A coin is put in the cake and the person who gets it in his/her piece will be the lucky person of the new year. Its ingredients are sugar, flour, butter, and eggs.

Constantinos Stavropoulos, Grade 3, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Posted by: Barbara Koziori | January 22, 2010

New Year’s cake

Every New Year’s Eve we make a cake. We make this cake with

  • flour
  • 1 glass of orange juice
  • 1/2 glass of milk
  • 3 vanillas
  • 1 cup of walnuts
  • 5 eggs
  • 1 glass of sugar

Our school's New Year's cake

Every year we put a coin in the cake. Everyone wants to find the coin with impatience because he/she will be lucky for the new year.

We cut the cake on the first minutes of the new year. The head of the family cuts a piece for everyone in the family.

Yesterday we had our own New Year’s cake cutting at our school. The priest of our local church came to bless the cutting of the cake and our headmaster cut it in so many pieces as all the children and the teachers at our school.

The priest from our local church and our headmaster at the New Year's cake cutting ceremony

This is a very old custom which we keep until today.

Lucy Kapsalou, Grade 3, 2nd Junior High School of Paralia

Here you are some music to start a New Year with it. A New Year Concert. Hope you will like it.

Posted by: joanmolar | January 15, 2010

Spain & Toros

Spain is our country. Spain has got 17 autonomus comunities. Here you can see the map. We are from Catalunya.

In Spain we have a really world know festival. It’s name’s San Fermín. In this festival you can see the TOROS (sauvage beef) running in the street.

Maybe you are asking why te brave beef is it so important for Spanish people. It’s because there are a lot of brave beef in Spain.

Written by Marc Lara y Antonio Zafra.

Posted by: joanmolar | January 15, 2010

Gavà archaeological site

Hello!

My name’s Sheila. I’m 10 years old. I want to explain you the visit to Gavà Prehistoric site. We go to Gavà, (a town near Barcelona) to see the  where lived old neolithic people. We see all the site. It’s very big. We also shaw some videos about the prehistoric people. We do some activities like making stone pieces. We can carry it to home. Bye, bye… Written by Sheila.

Posted by: joanmolar | January 15, 2010

Spanish Football Team

This is Spain’s flag. Now we want to talk about the Spain Football team. Our players are: Iker Casillas, Sergio Ramos, Carles Puyol, Gerard Pique and Raul Albiol as a defenders. Xavi Hernández, Andrès Iniesta i David Silva as a midle fields. David Villa, Cesc Fabregas and Fernando Torres are the attack players. Our trainer is Vicente del Bosque. Written by Albert & Guillem

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | January 10, 2010

The Bishops’ Palace in Kielce

Hello! I’m Clara. I would like to show you the National Museum in Kielce, which is the former Palace of Krakow Bishops (1637–1641): which was once a summer residence of Bishops of Kraków, built in early baroque style by Giovanni Battista Trevano and Tomasz Poncino; there is  an important gallery of Polish paintings there now. It’s really very attractive and in summer you can see a beautiful garden situated on the west side od it.

Posted by: agatawaltrowska | January 5, 2010

Thank you children from Istanbul for your cards!

Today we have received your Christmas cards. Thank you very much. We will put them on the board on the school hall. They are great.

Best wishes from very snowy Zabor

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